The Oakland County area has an abundance of opportunities for existing businesses and new ventures.
When the going gets rough, the entrepreneurial spirit gets creative and resourceful.
The Oakland Press has gathered upcoming events, news and links to help business owners and professionals succeed.

Friday, April 29, 2011

Survey unveals 'Unrealistic Career Expectations'

 The following is from The Creative Group, an employment agency for design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals. Visit The Creative Group for more information.

One-Third of Entry-Level Job Applicants Have Unrealistic Career Expectations according to The Creative Group survey

All professionals aspire to land their dream jobs, but some new grads may be too starry-eyed when seeking their first post-college gig. Thirty-six percent of advertising and marketing executives interviewed by The Creative Group said entry-level candidates have unrealistic career expectations. The survey results also suggest those who want to land a job should be prepared to ace the interview. 35 percent of executives said this meeting carries the most weight when evaluating applicants for entry-level advertising or marketing roles.
The national survey was developed by The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service providing interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals on a project and full-time basis, and conducted by an independent research firm.
Advertising and marketing executives were asked, “In your opinion, how realistic or unrealistic are entry-level candidates’ overall career expectations in terms of salary, job responsibilities, etc.?” Their responses:
Very realistic
10%
Somewhat realistic
46%
Somewhat unrealistic
30%
Very unrealistic
6%
Don’t know/no answer
    9%
101%*
*Responses do not total 100 percent due to rounding.
Advertising and marketing executives also were asked, “Which of the following do you consider most important when hiring an entry-level advertising or marketing professional?” Their responses:
Interview performance
35%
Resume
27%
Portfolio
15%
References
11%
Social media presence (e.g., LinkedIn profile, Facebook or Twitter page)
3%
Experience
1%
Other
1%
Don’t know/no answer
      8%
101%*
*Responses do not total 100 percent due to rounding.
 “Researching average salaries and skills in demand can help new grads avoid over- or underselling themselves during the application process,” said Donna Farrugia, executive director of The Creative Group. “Job candidates also should learn as much as possible about the companies they are interviewing with so they can ask informed questions when meeting with hiring managers and get a realistic sense of what the position entails.” 
About the Survey
The national study was developed by The Creative Group and conducted by an independent research firm. It is based on more than 500 telephone interviews -- approximately 375 with marketing executives randomly selected from companies with 100 or more employees and 125 with advertising executives randomly selected from agencies with 20 or more employees.

Thursday, April 28, 2011

Groupon leader to speak in Troy today

Kevin Petry, vice president of sales development at Groupon, will talk about the company’s pioneering relationship marketing practices in a presentation titled “What’s the ‘Deal’ with Groupon?” at the monthly meeting of the Marketing & Sales Executives of Detroit, (MSED) on Thursday, April 28.
The meeting will be held at the Management Education Center, 811 W. Square Lake Road in Troy, and will begin with hors d’oeuvres and networking at 5 p.m., the speaker presentation at 6 p.m. and dessert and networking at 7 p.m. The cost for the event is $45 for MSED members and $60 for non-members. Call 248-643-9685 or visit www.msedetroit.org.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

'Image is Everything' seminars offered

Consolidated Professional Services of Southfield will hold personal and professional image updates/improvement seminars. There are morning and afternoon sessions on Friday, April 29, May 6 and May 20. The cost is $40 for early registration and $45 at the door per seminar. Register at www.cpstraining.org or call 248-352-9917.

Empowering Michigan Career Fair
A free “Empowering Michigan Career Fair” is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, April 29 at the Marriott Hotel, 3600 Centerpointe Parkway, Pontiac. Companies hiring  include First Financial Insurance Group, Detroit Engineering Products, Axa Advisors, 1-800-Hanson, Global Information Technology, Dialogue Marketing. Businesses contact JobFairGiant.com at 734-956-4550. Visit www.expogiant.com or www.JobFairGiant.com.

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Social Media: Gold Mine or Fool’s Gold?

WWJ Newsradio 950 is presenting a free business breakfast, Social Media and Your Business: Gold Mine or Fool’s Gold?, Wednesday, April 27  at Schoolcraft College’s VisTaTech Center, 18600 Haggerty Road, Livonia. Registration, continental breakfast and networking begin at 7:15 a.m., with the program running from 8:15 until 9:30 am. Admission is free, advance registration is requested. Visit www.cbsdetroit.com

Auto Alley International Business Center opening
Automation Alley is hosting the grand opening of its International Business Center, 8 a.m. to noon, April 28 at Automation Alley Headquarters. The International Business Center will provide services and assistance to visiting international companies, as well as Michigan companies looking to access global markets. See the video -conferencing capabilities, private Skype room, high-tech collaboration room and an executive board room with interactive whiteboard technology. Event is free. Continental breakfast will be provided. Visit www.automationalley.com or call 800-427-5100

CEOs workshop offered in Troy
The Renaissance Executive Forum’s CEO Tools workshop will be held 8 to 11 a.m. Thursday, April 28 at the Michigan State University Management Education Center at 811 West Square Lake Road in Troy. This is a complimentary event for qualified top executives. To register, visit www.regonline.com/ceotoolsworkshop or call Bob Quigley at 248-651-9130 or visit www.executiveforums.com.

Friday, April 22, 2011

Maximize professional memberships

CREW Detroit President Offers 10 Tips to Make the Most of Your Membership
As 2011 President of Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Detroit, an organization influencing the success of the commercial real estate industry by advancing the achievements of women, Marilyn Nix knows her way around networking events and membership-driven associations. The Principal and Broker of Marilyn P. Nix & Associates, LLC, Bloomfield Hills and a former real estate executive with General Motors, Nix says there is a strategy to maximizing the benefits of membership in any organization that has a dual purpose of educating its members and facilitating new business opportunities. 
“When we join an organization for the expressed purpose of learning more about business or a specific industry, there is the incorrect assumption that business opportunities will follow,” offers Nix. “But new business from member organizations is not automatic, even if you attend every meeting. There’s a strategy that can be followed to increase the potential for creating new business.”
Nix offers the following ten tips.
1.    Don’t be a wallflower, get involved!  Every membership organization has committees. Being part of a committee is one of the best ways to build your network and exercise your skills.
2.    Use the question mark.  Bring one relevant question to every meeting to serve as both an icebreaker and a legitimate topic for discussion, and you will expand your knowledge as well as others.
3.    Meet and greet.  Introduce yourself to someone you don’t know at each meeting or event to develop your network and make a lasting impression.
4.    Think outside your location box.  If your organization is a chapter in a national network, attend regional and national meetings as a way to expand meaningful opportunities beyond your geographic comfort zone.
5.    Tap into an organization’s website.  Navigate the organization’s website frequently for research tools, information and opportunities in your profession.
6.    Find a mentor.  Further cultivating a one-to-one relationship with another member can provide invaluable opportunities that enhance your career.
7.    Dine with decision-makers.  Schedule monthly breakfasts, coffees, lunches or dinners with a board member for savvy advice on the value of maximizing membership opportunities.
8.    Streamline your encounters at an event by making a list of people you want to meet.  If available prior to an event, check out the list of registrants (some organizations make them accessible) and target the people you want to meet. If no list is available, craft a list of potential attendees as a guideline.
9.    Reach out to the community.  By participating in an organization’s outreach activities, you’ll strengthen your bonds with other members and make a difference.
10. Synergize.  Be a resource to other members and build cooperative relationships that will set the stage for long-term business alliances.
“When you maximize your affiliation with a business organization, you’re better able to navigate through economic challenges and put yourself on a path toward professional success,” Nix concludes.  
About CREW Detroit
CREW Detroit (www.crewdetroit.org), founded in 1986, is a dedicated to influencing the success of the commercial real estate industry by advancing the achievements of women through networking and member-to-member driven business opportunities. It is a founding chapter, and one of the largest local chapters, of CREW Network, a professional organization of more than 8,000 women and men in commercial real estate women in the U.S. and Canada that serves as a key resource to CREW chapter members and the commercial real estate industry.  CREW Network members hail from all disciplines of commercial real estate and represent every type of expert required to "do the deal." Learn more at www.crewnetwork.org.

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Business people needed for mock interviews

Two-Hours Can Shape a Middle-Schooler’s Professional Future

Business professionals are needed to share their wisdom with future leaders during the annual A.P.T. to Succeed portfolio review program, a partnership program between the Troy School District and the Troy Chamber’s Business & Education Roundtable.
A.P.T. to Succeed takes place throughout the month of May and June at four different middle schools. Business people are asked to have mock interviews with “graduating” eighth grade students, focusing on their academic achievements, personal time management skills, and teamwork. Each student presents his or her portfolio of work, which includes items they have been collecting since sixth grade.
“Two hours of your time lending career insight, educational and career goals can make a big difference on a student’s future,” said Bonnie Britton of Larson Middle School and founder of the A.P.T. to Succeed program. “More than 100 slots need to be filled to make A.P.T. to Succeed successful, so please feel free to recruit additional colleagues to join you for this program.”
The interviews will take place:
May 9-11 at Larson Middle School:
May 11-12 at Boulan Middle School
May 17-18 at Smith Middle School
June 1 at Baker Middle School
To volunteer, contact Rose DeClerck at the Troy School District at 248-823-4004.

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Inside Google and NextWave events are tomorrow

TROY
April 21: Inside Google
Round Table Productions presents “Inside Google,” a lunch and learn presentation featuring Michelle Morris, industry director for automotive at Google is 11:30 a.m. Thursday, April 21, at Shield’s Restaurant, 1476 W. Maple Road, Troy. It begins and ends with networking. The program starts at 12:35 p.m. Event Admission is $15. To register, visit www.roundtablepromotions.com or call 248-383-5793. Limited seating is available.

TROY
April 21: NextWave networking and webcasting
NextWave Media Studios will host a business networking event and broadcast it live on the Internet. “It’s networking, plus webcasting at the same time,” said NextWave Media Studios CEO Nancy Skinner. “Combine those two and it equals a Netcast, an event for business leaders to meet face-to-face and broadcast their message simultaneously for an online audience.” The NextWave Media Studios Netcast is 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, April 21. The netcast will be streamed live via Ustream.tv and can also be viewed at www.nextwavemediastudios.com. The event will take place at NextWave Media Studios “Digitorium.” Those interested in attending or presenting at the NextWave Media Studios Netcast should contact Jason Chapman at 248-556-7552 or jason.chapman@nwave.us.com.


BIRMINGHAM
April 21: Government Forecast
The Birmingham Bloomfield Chamber continues its 2011 Forecast Series with the “Government Forecast” presented by Philip Power, founder and chairman of The Center for Michigan. The forecast luncheon is 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21 at The Townsend Hotel, 100 Townsend St, Birmingham. The cost, which includes lunch is $50 for members and $60 for nonmembers. Reservations are required, visit www.bbcc.com/events or call 248-644-1700.

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

It's a busy time for biz events

April 19: Health care via mobile computer
The Impact of Mobile Computing on Health Care will be discussed 3 to 5:30 p.m. today, April 19, at Automation Alley Resource Center, 2675 Bellingham Drive, Troy. Registration is $20 at the door for members $25 at the door for nonmembers. Call 800-427-5100 or visit www.automationalley.com.

April 20: Breakfast with Linkner of ePrize
The 2010-2011 Defining Leadership Breakfast will feature Josh Linkner, chairman and founder of ePrize 7:30 to 9 a.m. Wednesday, April 20, at the Management Education Center, 811 W Square Lake Road, Troy. Linkner founded and sold three technology companies. He is also a jazz guitarist who has performed professionally since age 13. As an author, speaker and blogger, he wrote the book “Disciplined Dreaming: A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity” that outlines the process he will share with attendees. The cost, which includes a complete breakfast, is $32 for Leadership Oakland alumni members and $36 for nonmembers and guests. Registration is required. Call Carol Dendler at 248-952-6880 or visit www.leadershipoakland.com/index.php/our-store.

April 20: SCORE Basic Marketing Workshop
SCORE Basic Marketing Workshop is 8:45 to noon Wednesday, April 20, at Southfield Public Library, 26300 Evergreen Road in Southfield. The cost is $45. Call 313-226-7947 to register.

April 20: Facebook for business
“Facebook: A Deep Dive for Business Owners and Marketers” is 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 20, at Automation Alley Headquarters, 2675 Bellingham Dr., Troy. Workshop includes how to most effectively use social media marketing. Lunch is included. The cost for members is $30 at-the-door. For nonmembers, it’s $50 at-the-door. To register, email info@automationalley.com or call 800-427-5100.

April 20: Troy Chamber Nonprofit Management Conference
The Troy Chamber of Commerce and Walsh College present the sixth annual Nonprofit Management Conference 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 20, at Walsh College, 3838 Livernois, Troy. The conference is for nonprofit professionals, board members and volunteers. The day begins with a continental breakfast and networking hour followed by two breakout sessions and a hot buffet lunch featuring keynote speaker Michael J. Brennan, President and CEO of United Way for Southeast Michigan. The cost for the day-long event, meals included, is $50 for Troy Chamber members and $95 for nonmembers. To register, call the 248-641-3694 or email jody@troychamber.com. Visit www.troychamber.com.

Monday, April 18, 2011

"Trust Me, I’m a Leader" boosts team spirit

Why Building a Culture of Trust Will Boost Employee Performance—and Maybe Even Save Your Company
"Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership, " a new book by John Hamm

 San Francisco, CA (April 2011)—Do your employees trust you? The brutal truth is probably not. It may not be fair, and you may not want to hear it, but chances are that previous leaders have poisoned the ground on which you’re trying to grow a successful business.
Why is trust so pivotal? According to John Hamm, it’s a matter of human nature: When employees don’t trust their leaders, they don’t feel safe. And when they don’t feel safe, they don’t take risks—and where there is no risk taken, there is less innovation, less “going the extra mile,” and therefore, very little unexpected upside.
“Feeling safe is a primal human need,” says Hamm, author of Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership (Jossey-Bass/A Wiley Imprint, February 2011, ISBN: 978-0-47092843-1, $24.95, www.unusuallyexcellent.com). “When that need isn’t met, our natural response is to focus energy toward a showdown with the perceived threat.
Hamm calls trustworthiness “the most noble and powerful of all the attributes of leadership.” He says leaders become trustworthy by building a track record of honesty, fairness, and integrity. For Hamm, cultivating this trust isn’t just a moral issue; it’s a practical one.
The first step starts with you, Hamm notes. As a leader, you must “go first”—and model trustworthiness for everyone else. Being trustworthy creates trust, yes. But beyond that, there are very specific things you can do to provide Unusually Excellent, trust-building leadership at your organization:
First, realize that being trustworthy doesn’t mean you have to be a Boy Scout. You don’t even have to be a warm or kind person, says Hamm. On the contrary, history teaches us that some of the most trustworthy people can be harsh, tough, or socially awkward—but their promises must be inviolate and their decisions fair.
“As anachronistic as it may sound in the twenty-first century, men and women whose word is their honor, and who can be absolutely trusted to be fair, honest, and forthright, are more likely to command the respect of others than, say, the nicest guy in the room,” says Hamm. “You can be tough. You can be demanding. You can be authentically whoever you really are. But as long as you are fair, as long as you do what you say consistently, you will still be trusted.”
Look for chances to reveal some vulnerability. We trust people we believe are real and also human (imperfect and flawed)—just like us. And that usually means allowing others to get a glimpse of our personal vulnerability—some authentic (not fabricated) weakness or fear or raw emotion that allows others to see us as like them, and therefore relate to us at the human level.
No matter how tempted you are, don’t BS your employees. Tell the truth, match your actions with your words, and match those words with the truth we all see in the world: no spin, no BS, no fancy justifications or revisionist history—just tell the truth.
Never, ever make the “adulterer’s guarantee.” This happens when you say to an employee, in effect, “I just lied to (someone else), but you can trust me because I’d never lie to you.” When an employee sees you committing any act of dishonesty or two-facedness, they’ll assume that you’ll do the same to them. They’ll start thinking back through all of their conversations with you, wondering what was real and what was disingenuous.
Don’t punish “good failures.” This is one of the stupidest things an organization can do—yet it happens all the time. A “good failure” is a term used in Silicon Valley to describe a new business start-up or mature company initiative that, by most measures, is well planned, well run, and well organized—yet for reasons beyond its control (an unexpected competitive product, a change in the market or economy) it fails. In other words, “good failures” occur when you play well, but still lose. Don’t squelch the flow of “bad” news. Do you (or others under you) shoot the messenger when she brings you bad news? If so, you can be certain that the messenger’s priority is not bringing you the information you need: It’s protecting her own hide. That’s why in most organizations good news zooms to the top of the organization, while bad news—data that reveals goals missed, problems lurking, or feedback that challenges or defeats your strategy—flows uphill like molasses in January.
“We must install a confidence and a trust that leaders in the organization value the facts, the truth, and the speed of delivery, not the judgments or interpretations of ‘good’ or ‘bad,’ and that messengers are valued, not shot,” says Hamm. “Make it crystal clear to your employees that you expect the truth and nothing but the truth from them. And always, always hold up your end of that deal. Don’t ever shoot the messenger and don’t ever dole out some irrational consequence.
Constantly tap into your “fairness conscience.” Precise agreements about what is fair are hard to negotiate, because each of us has our own sense of fairness. But at the level of general principle, there is seldom any confusion about what fair looks like. Just ask yourself: Would most people see this as fair or unfair? You’ll know the answer (indeed, as a leader, you’re paid to know it).
“If you treat your followers fairly, and do so consistently, you will set a pattern of behavior for the entire organization,” says Hamm.
Don’t take shortcuts. Every organization wants to succeed. That’s why, inevitably, there is a constant pressure to let the end justify the means. This pressure becomes especially acute when either victory or failure is in immediate sight. That’s when the usual ethical and moral constraints are sometimes abandoned—always for good reasons, and always “just this once”—in the name of expediency.
“Sometimes this strategy even works,” says Hamm. “But it sets the precedent for repeatedly using these tactics at critical moments—not to mention a kind of ‘mission creep’ by which corner-cutting begins to invade operations even when they aren’t at a critical crossroads.”
Separate the bad apples from the apples who just need a little direction. The cost of untruths to an organization can be huge in terms of time, money, trust, and reputation. As a leader, you have to recognize that you are not going to be able to “fix” a thief, a pathological liar, or a professional con artist—all of these must go, immediately.
“In my coaching practice, there are three failure modes that I will decline to coach: integrity, commitment, and chronic selfishness, that is, manipulating outcomes for individual gain at the expense of the larger opportunity,” says Hamm. “These are character traits, not matters of skill, practice, knowledge, or experience.
“That said, one huge mistake leaders make is to doubt or distrust someone because their work or performance disappoints us,” he adds. “Performance problems should be managed fairly and with little judgment of the person’s underlying character, unless that is the issue at the root of the trouble. Ultimately, unlike my failure modes, improving performance is often merely a matter of feedback, course correction, and some coaching.”
“Trustworthiness is never entirely pure,” says Hamm. “Everyone fails to achieve perfection.

 “A working environment of trust is a place where teams stay focused, give their utmost effort, and in the end do their best work,” he concludes. “It’s a place where we can trust ourselves, trust others, trust our surroundings, or—best of all—trust all three.”

About the Author:
John Hamm is one of the top leadership experts in Silicon Valley. He was named one of the country’s Top 100 venture capitalists in 2009 by AlwaysOn and has led investments in many successful high-growth companies as a partner at several Bay Area VC firms. Hamm has also been a CEO, a board member at over thirty companies, and a CEO adviser and executive coach to senior leaders at companies such as Documentum, Cisco, Hewlett-Packard, TaylorMade-adidas Golf and McAfee. John teaches leadership at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.
About the Book:
Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership (Jossey-Bass/A Wiley Imprint, February 2011, ISBN: 978-0-47092843-1, $24.95, www.unusuallyexcellent.com) is available at bookstores nationwide and from major online booksellers.


Submitted by Dottie DeHart, DeHart & Company Public Relations

Friday, April 15, 2011

Inventors Council of Mid-Michigan inspires

The Inventors Council of Mid-Michigan, holds a gathering of the minds of inventors on the second Thursday of each month. The council is a resource for creative people who need ideas on how to take an idea and run with it.
At the last meeting, Orville Crain, CEO of Klever Innovations LLC was the speaker. He talked about how he started his box cutter business by taking an idea and following through starting with a sketch, then building a prototype and then patenting it and marketing it.
He has two partners in the business, and they each fill a niche in the success. Crain spoke about how rather than ideas are a dime a dozen, an idea is worth .0083333333 etc. He said, "You're not an inventor until you do something with that idea."

The next meeting is 7 p.m. May 12 at Walli's Restaurant & Banquet Center South at I-69 and Center Road (1341 S. Center Road) in Burton, Michigan. The group has been meeting on the second Thursday of each month, since 1997. The cost to attend the meetings is usually $5.


The Inventors Council was started by Bob Ross of Service Corps Of Retired Executives (SCORE) to Larry Ford, president of the Flint Area Chamber of Commerce (FACC), in 1997.
Today the Council provides invention review services to many new product innovators and it has helped hundreds of independent inventors from being ripped off by invention scam companies. People travel from all over Michigan to gain knowledge and expertise from the Inventors Council,
The current Council has a leadership group of seven highly experienced directors who continue the volunteer effort to reach out and help independent inventors fulfill their dreams of bringing new and innovative products to market, in a tradition of the great American pursuit to invent.
Membership in the Inventors Council costs $55 a year. Call 810-621-3468 or email Jim Harris with questions to harris03@charter.net.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Allegra moves to new digs in Madison Heights

Allegra moves to new digs in Madison Heights
Allegra has moved to new facility in Madison Heights. Formerly located at 28003 John R Road, the new location at 27635 John R Road. Allegra of Madison Heights provides marketing services for area businesses including printing, copying, mailing services, fulfillment, promotional products and graphic design. They offer traditional and digital solutions, offset printing, short-run color and aqueous coating.  For more information,  contact Allegra at (248) 543-3030 or visit their Web site at www.allegra.net.

Zonta Club hosts "A Tea to Remember" at Holly HotelThe Zonta Club of Pontiac, a professional women’s club, is hosting North Oakland's spring fundraiser,  "A Tea to Remember," 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 17, at the historic Holly Hotel, 110 Battle Alley, Holly. The fundraiser features traditional Victorian Style tea and Irish/Celtic music performed by Anne and Rob Burns. Proceeds from the event support programs to improve the status of women in Pontiac and North Oakland County and globally in international projects. Tickets are $25 per person. Contact Tea Registrar at 248-626-4394 or email to judyknitter@comcast.net.

Change anything for personal successRochester Hills-based Vital Skills International, a provider of leadership training and performance solutions, is hosting Author Joseph Grenny speaking on his new book, “Change Anything: The New Science of Personal Success," book launch at the VisTaTech Center at Schoolcraft College 8 to 11 a.m. April 19, at VisTaTech Center at Schoolcraft College, 8600 Haggerty Road, Livonia.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Humor workshop tonight in Franklin

Michigan International Professional Association is hosting a workshop on humor, 6:30 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, April 12,  at The Franklin Grill, 32760 Franklin Road, Franklin. Connie Ettinger will share tips on how to find humor, be funny and bring out a simple smile on someone’s face. Also features Steven Kade, the illustration artist. The cost is $35 per person and $65 for two tickets. It includes a warm entree and dessert along with a glass of wine. Reservations requested by April 8 at www.mipadetroit.org or mail a check to the order of MIPA, c/o Marguerite Dillard, 1735 East Lake Drive, Novi, MI 48377.

Improving Productivity
The Troy Chamber Women’s Business Forum’s next program will be “Got Time? Improving Productivity through Effective Time Management.” The session, taught by Laura Rolands of LSR Coaching and Consulting, LLC, is 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 13, at Flagstar Bank Headquarters, 5151 Corporate Dr., Troy. Participants will learn strategies to overcome attention-related challenges and will create an action plan tailored to one of his/her specific goals. The cost to participate is $16 for Troy Chamber members or $21 for non-members. An additional $5 is charged the day of the event. To register, call 248-641-8151 or email: theteam@troychamber.com.

Marketing for results seminar
The Rochester Regional Chamber is hosting “Say Something in a Powerful Way” featuring George Piliouras, owner of George Piliouras & Associates LLC. This seminar instructs businesses on whether marketing and advertising is getting results. The seminar is 9 to 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 13, at the City of Rochester Hills Administration Building, 1000 Rochester Hills Drive, Rochester Hills. To register for this free seminar, call 248-651-6700 or visit www.rrc-mi.com.

Monday, April 11, 2011

FutureMidwest digital business conference fuels startups

FutureMidwest digital business conference, is Thursday and Friday, April 28 and 29 at Eastern Market in Detroit. Associated with the event is Funded by Night, a one-day competition that draws startups from around the nation to compete for a $100,000 convertible note from two local venture capital firms, Detroit Venture Partners and Ludlow Ventures. The competition is Thursday afternoon, April 28, when the selected 25 companies will pitch their products to potential investors.
The conference will feature keynotes by Josh Linkner, founder and chairman of Detroit-based e-Prize, digital interactive promotion firm, and Dan Gilbert, chairman and founder of Quicken Loans Inc., who will speak about his vision for turning downtown Detroit into a technology hub. The conference also features presentations, group breakout sessions, relationship-building opportunities and influencers who are taking action to redefine business in the digital age.
The Premiere conference sponsors include MRM Digital Agency, Airfoil Public Relations, Verizon Wireless, Cadillac Travel, Detroit Venture Partners, Ludlow Ventures, Mindfield, Quicken Loans, Logic Solutions, Green Sky Creative, Detroit Creative Corridor Center, ePrize and the Facility Matrix Group.
The conference focuses on five areas that are vital to the region and its economy: integrating digital platforms into marketing programs, improving the user experience, using mobile communications for information exchange, business intelligence/analytics, and regional growth derived from the application of digital technology.
Tickets to attend FutureMidwest, including the Funded by Night competition, are $250. Single tickets that provide admission to both Funded by Night and the FutureMidwest evening networking event April 28 are $25 for professionals and $10 for students. To register or for information, visit www.futuremidwest.com and fundedbynight.com.

Friday, April 8, 2011

How to Run a Profitable Small Business

Troy Chamber of Commerce is offering a free seminar, “How to Run a Profitable Small Business,” presented by Ed King, MBA, CPA and author with more than 30 years of small business consulting experience. Two sessions: 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, April 14, at the Troy Chamber, 4555 Investment Dr., lower level training room, in the Michigan Schools and Government Credit Union building or 9 to 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 16, at the Embassy Suites Troy, 850 Tower Dr., Troy. To register, call the Troy Chamber at 248-641-8151or visit www.troychamber.com/calendar.

Zonta Club hosts spring fundraiser at Holly Hotel
The Zonta Club of Pontiac, a professional women’s club, is hosting North Oakland's spring fundraiser, "A Tea to Remember," 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 17, at the historic Holly Hotel, 110 Battle Alley, Holly. The fundraiser features traditional Victorian Style tea and Irish/Celtic music performed by Anne and Rob Burns. Proceeds from the event support programs to improve the status of women in Pontiac and North Oakland County and globally in international projects. Tickets are $25 per person. Contact Tea Registrar at 248-626-4394 or email to judyknitter@comcast.net.

Thursday, April 7, 2011

NextWave hosts "NetCast" networking event

 NextWave Media Studios will host a business networking event and broadcast it live on the Internet.
"It's Networking, plus Webcasting at the same time," said NextWave Media Studios CEO Nancy Skinner. "Combine those two and it equals a Netcast, an event for business leaders to meet face-to-face and broadcast their message simultaneously for an online audience."
The NextWave Media Studios Netcast is 6 to 9 p.m. April 21. The Netcast will be streamed live via Ustream.tv and can also be viewed at www.nextwavemediastudios.com.
The event will take place at NextWave Media Studios "Digitorium."
Those interested in attending or presenting at the NextWave Media Studios Netcast should contact Jason Chapman at 248-556-7552 or jason.chapman@nwave.us.com.

Comcast of Detroit adds Lynn Montemayoras as Detroit Local Sales Manager
Comcast of Detroit has named Lynn Montemayoras as the new Detroit Local Sales Manager.  In this role, she will lead an experienced and talented Detroit Local Sales Team.  Lynn has an extensive background in sales and advertising.  She brings with her over 18 years of combined sales and management experience including her most recent roll as the GSM of WCSX-FM which she held prior for the past two years.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Learn about the fashion business classes starting

For those interested in starting their own clothing or accessory line, The Community House,
is hosting Starting A Fashion Business with instructor Milda Bublys, former Fashion Institute of Technology of New York professor. The class is 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, April 6. The cost is $35.
 Additional classes include, “Creating a Fashion Portfolio,” 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays, April 19 through May 3. The cost is $119 plus a $5 materials fee.
Creating a Fashion Drawing is 6 to 9 p.m. Thursdays, April 14-28. The cost is $119 plus a $5 materials fee.
To register for classes, contact The Community House, 380 South Bates Street, Birmingham, 248/644-5832, or online at www.communityhouse.com.

 Easter Seals hires VP and Director
Easter Seals Michigan hired Rich Hollis as the Senior Vice President of Finance and Operations and Laura Covintree, CFRE, as the Director of Marketing & Development. Hollis’ responsibilities in this capacity will include providing financial management, strategic, and tactical leadership to further the development of the organization. Covintree’s responsibilities in this capacity include raising awareness about Easter Seals; building a strong donor base to support Easter Seals’ programs and overseeing strategic and operational planning.

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Lunch & Learn Inside Google

Round Table Productions presents “Inside Google,” a lunch and learn presentation featuring Michelle Morris, Industry Director for Automotive at Google is 11:30 a.m. Thursday, April 21 at Shield’s Restaurant, 1476 W. Maple Road, Troy. It begins and ends with networking. The program starts at 12:35 p.m. Event Admission is $15. To register, visit www.roundtablepromotions.com or call 248-383-5793. Limited seating is available.

MontAd hires Dean Krispin
MontAd, a full-service marketing agency, announces that Dean Krispin has joined the firm. The announcement was made by Al Haberstroh, president, MontAd. Krispin, a resident of Rochester Hills, will be responsible for supporting MontAd clients with a variety of strategic digital marketing programs and elements, including social media.  He has designed and implemented digital marketing programs for some of the world’s leading B2B and B2C brands, as well as non-profit organizations.

Monday, April 4, 2011

MIPA hosts workshop on humor

Michigan International Professional Association is hosting a workshop on humor, 6:30 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, April 12 at The Franklin Grill, 32760 Franklin Road, Franklin. Connie Ettinger will share tips on how to find humor, be funny and bring out a simple smile on someone's face. Also features Steven Kade, the illustration artist. The cost is $35 per person and $65 for two tickets. It includes a warm entree and dessert along with a glass of wine. Reservations requested by April 8 at www.mipadetroit.org or mail a check to the order of MIPA, c/o Marguerite Dillard, 1735 East Lake Drive, Novi, MI 48377.

Friday, April 1, 2011

Jacobs Media names Digital & Social Media Strategist



Media consulting firm Jacobs Media announced it has expanded its services with the addition of Lori Lewis for the newly created position of Digital & Social Media Strategist. Lewis comes to Jacobs Media from Midwest Communications, where she has been the Multi-Media Content Manager since 2008.
Jacobs Media’s President Fred Jacobs said, “Lori has developed a great track record of implementing actionable social media strategies as well as playing a key role in digital revenue generation.”
“Because of her extraordinary experience, Lori will be working not only with current clients, but with station clusters and new media companies, as she helps develop their strategies and tactics,” says Jacobs. “We are going beyond our rock radio roots because of the tremendous potential for digital and social media growth regardless of format. Lori’s worked with a diverse group of stations and formats, and is well suited to help them achieve success in this key area of growth for the industry.




Berline hires graphic artist
Berline, a Bloomfield Hills based advertising, marketing, and digital communications firm, has named Michael Hunter as Graphic Artist. Hunter is a recent graduate of the College for Creative Studies in Detroit with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Advertising Design. He and two classmates were featured on the back cover of Advertising Age for their contest winning idea for the Crain’s Detroit Business sponsored “Detroit DeFacto” campaign about how to keep young professionals in Michigan.